Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

"
If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

"
Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot, by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse." -- Me

"What the hell is an `Aluminum Falcon'?" -- Emperor Palpatine

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Sunday, February 11, 2018

Your Sunday Morning Jet Noise

A DC-8:


This one almost went horribly wrong.

2 comments:

Old NFO said...

Yep, good old J75s on it! Funny thing is, those same engines were used on Ashville class PGs!

CenterPuke88 said...

That close call is scary. I used the field elevation and the metar to calculate a density altitude of 9188 ft. The only comparable performance data I could find was for NASA’s DC-8-72 (same CFM-56’s), and they required between 2,300 meters and 3000 meters, depending upon takeoff weight. That was on a standard day at sea level, there was no correction data.

The field used had 3,500 meters plus a 200 meter overrun, but also has terrain rising above 30 meters at 1,500 meters from the runway end of Rwy 01. The -70 is also limited to a 9 degree initial pitch to avoid a tail strike. Assuming a perfect rotation and climb at runway end, that puts the flight path about 70 meters over terrain, but they looked quite a bit closer. Oh, did I forget to mention, the final 2,000 meters of Rwy 01 has a 0.78% upslope...

The Colombian investigation revealed the Captain “self dispatched”, rather than using the approved dispatchers at the airport, and the airline was banned from operations in Colombia.