Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot, by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse." -- Me

"What the hell is an `Aluminum Falcon'?" -- Emperor Palpatine

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Friday, March 9, 2018

Because It's Friday

Steam tractors:

I don't know if I'd want to stand next to one of those things.


B said...

The article you cited pretty much spells it out....Even if they weren't aware of the corrosion issue, the rest is pretty much fucking up by the numbers.

1) Failing to thoroughly inspect an old boiler before firing it.
2) Failing to maintain and fully understand the importance of safety devices and practices.
2a) Apparent knowledge that the crown sheet had been welded in several places and not have a thorough and complete inspection done on it by a qualified and certified boiler inspector.
2b) Apparent knowledge that the steam pressure gauge was inaccurate and not replacing it.
2c) Apparent knowledge that the pressure relief valve did not lift at its set pressure of 125 psi and not repairing or replacing it.
2d) Not confirming the accuracy of the water gauge by using the try cocks frequently and making sure they are free of obstructions.

4) Apparent over-firing and failure to maintain an adequate, constant water level.

I was taught how to fire and operate portable steam equipment at 17 years old, and these are all against what I was taught.

Further, at least 3 times a year, we would not only check the safety valve for free movement, but would, in fact, fire the boiler to the point that the safety valve lifted, verifying that the boiler was strong enough to handle that pressure level, but also that the safety worked.

Deadstick said...

330,000 foot-pounds...that's about a quarter pound TNT equivalent.

B said...

Deadstick: Think about all those square inches inside a boiler. Not just the exterior dimensional area, but the area of the tubes as well. Multiply by (apparently) 215 lbs PER SQUARE INCH. Now release it in (about) 3/10 of a second.

Plus it was mostly straight down, so all that superheated steam flashed outwards, but none of it went upwards (at first) it went down, then out. More of it was directed at the people.

Deadstick said...

Ummm, yes, B, that's what happens in a boiler explosion, and that's how much energy it delivers. What's your point?