Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

"
If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

"
Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot, by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse." -- Me

"What the hell is an `Aluminum Falcon'?" -- Emperor Palpatine

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Thursday, March 8, 2018

The Overlooked

The New York Times is publishing the obituaries of people who were overlooked, since most obits published are about while men.

First up: Ida B. Wells

If you've not read her book on the horrors of lynching, which was first published in 1892, you should.

For one thing, she believed that "a Winchester rifle should have a place of honor in every black home, and it should be used for that protection which the law refuses to give." Another things is that nearly a century before it entered common use among the majority population, she used the term "Afro-American". She tried to organize boycotts of businesses that practiced segregation: "The appeal to the white man's pocket has ever been more effectual than all the appeals ever made to his conscience."

It took a couple more generations before activists took her advice and began applying the power of the purse.

1 comment:

3383 said...

I got the feeling that the NYT obit choices were society's fault, not that of the Times.

Still, good information can be overlooked. I've downloaded the book you mention; Ms. Wells sounds like someone to be listened to.