Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

"
If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

"
Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot,
by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse.
" -- Me

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Wednesday, January 30, 2013

Your Latest Computerized Time-Sink

A punch-card version of Google.

It'll return the first eight hits and then kick you over to a version that isn't fifty years old.

And if that isn't enough for you, try your hand at a virtual slide rule, with more of them here.

3 comments:

w3ski said...

That was a blast from the past.
Up until a year or two ago the national Automotive Cert Board used the updated version: fill in the appropriate dot with your pencil. At work I diagnosed computer versus input/output signal problems by watching wavelengths on an oscilloscope, at Test time it was like Grade School.
They finally went to computer based testing.
w3ski

w3ski said...

And Slide rules! I remember people carrying them but that was right about the time that computers began to exist. I am a child of the electronic age. In 9th grade we were taught to scavenge parts from dismantled Nike Rockets to make simple electronic novelties.
w3ski

Nangleator said...

I programmed with punch cards in high school. My biggest program was around 100 cards, but I saw others with stacks and stacks of cards. With punch cards, debugging is not a programmer's only heartache. Folds, rips, and dog-ears become serious business.