Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

"
If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

"
Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot, by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse." -- Me

"What the hell is an `Aluminum Falcon'?" -- Emperor Palpatine

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Monday, March 4, 2019

Only Perfect People Can Fly on American Airlines

American Airlines is apologizing to a South Carolina mother and her young son after they were booted from a flight because of their rare, genetic skin condition.

Jordan Flake said she was discriminated against and wrongfully kicked off a South Carolina-bound flight with her toddler son, Jackson, after an airline employee inquired about her "rash" shortly before takeoff.
Flight attendants on some airlines seem to have a strain of petty tyrants running through them. What about having a rash makes a passenger a security risk to the flying waitstaff prison guards?

3 comments:

bearsense said...

When I was in the bidness, AA had the reputation for the worst flight attendante. USAir had the honor of the worst customer service and baggage handling. They merged --- any surprises ??

Adrian Demarais said...

As a counterpoint, measles is rare enough that one might presume that some folk have no idea what it actually looks like, other than "a rash on the face and skin". So, I would expect any airline to inquire about a possibly contagious disease boarding a plane that might also have immune-compromised passengers.

That said, once they were informed of the actual cause of the rash, they should have backed down.

CenterPuke88 said...

The condition is “ichthyosis”, which causes fishlike scaling. It in no way resembles measles, as is seen by the picture of the mother and child. With ubiquitous cellphones, it’s pretty easy to check.