Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

"
If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

"
Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot,
by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse.
" -- Me

"What the hell is an `Aluminum Falcon'?" -- Emperor Palpatine

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Friday, April 21, 2017

Because It's Friday

Tornado broke the "century mark":


They're really serious about steam in the UK.

3 comments:

CenterPuke88 said...

Lovely bit. Wondering if you've ever visited the National Railway Museum in York? As an obvious steam fan, I would suggest you do, if you haven't.

deadstick said...

"We were swingin' around a bit..."

Rule, Britannia.

Eck! said...

Whats a bit funny is other than testing the Tornado for its peak sustained speed
steam has long gone past 100....This was not uncommon in the 30s and many engines
achieve schedules in the 110+ range. There are more than a few that still run
faster than 70-80 in the flatlands.

The brits should be proud for doing this in the diesel era. It doesn't hurt that Tornado is less than 20 years since built from the ground up. That itself is an accomplishment.

Why is it important? For steam to run on the mainlines they have to be able to
run to a schedule that does not interfere with normal operations of that block
of track. In some cases to do that it means the steam must run as the engine
with a manifest load to justify the time in block. In many cases it means a
reliable and fast engine is required or the result is like airlines when
weather strikes with compounded schedule changes and possible compounded
delays. Railroads have worked hard for over a century to run smoothly and
on time.

Eck!