Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

"
If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

"
Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot, by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse." -- Me

"What the hell is an `Aluminum Falcon'?" -- Emperor Palpatine

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

100 Years On

On this day in 1917, President Wilson asked Congress to declare war on the German Empire. Four days later, they did.

Wilson might have thought that entering the war would make the world safe for democracy. It arguably had the opposite effect. The crushing of Imperial Germany led, less than 30 years later, to dictatorial regimes controlling all of eastern Europe.

Years ago, I read something that the British government had informed Wilson that if the Americans didn't enter the war, that the British would have to sue for peace. One can never know, of course, what would have happened if Wilson had turned a deaf ear to the British and let the war play out among the European powers.

If the United States had not entered the war, imagining an outcome that would have led to even more carnage than that which arose from the Great War might be a difficult endeavor.

3 comments:

Paul Wartenberg said...

there were other factors such as Germany's ham-handed attempt to get Mexico to distract us with a border fight (Zimmermann Telegram) and the uptick in sub warfare (Germans began sinking ANY ship with a US flag in international waters). While the Brits wanted America in the war on their side, the Germans were making the decision easier for Wilson and Congress with their inept handling of affairs with us.

3383 said...

The English never had a problem lying to us to get us in on their side. WW1 and WW2 for sure.

Comrade Misfit said...

3383, indeed. One of the problems that arose in W2 was that so many people believed that that reports of the concentration camps were just another round of British propaganda.