Words of Advice:

"Never Feel Sorry For Anyone Who Owns an Airplane."-- Tina Marie

"
If Something Seems To Be Too Good To Be True, It's Best To Shoot It, Just In Case." -- Fiona Glenanne

"
Flying the Airplane is More Important than Radioing Your Plight to a Person on the Ground
Who is Incapable of Understanding or Doing Anything About It.
" -- Unknown

"There seems to be almost no problem that Congress cannot, by diligent efforts and careful legislative drafting, make ten times worse." -- Me

"What the hell is an `Aluminum Falcon'?" -- Emperor Palpatine

"Eck!" -- George the Cat

Monday, December 24, 2018

50 Years Ago: Xmas From the Moon


The broadcast, at the time, was watched by more people than any other TV show or event.

I was such a space geek, at the time, that my parents put their TV in my room for manned missions. I saw this oen, live.

It wasn't until a couple of years later, when the main oxygen tank of the Apollo 13 Service Module blew up, that people understood the risk of going into orbit around the Moon entailed.

2 comments:

Paul said...

I am surprised that we haven't sent more camera bots into orbit around celestial bodies like the Moon and Mars and others. I know the signal feed may be insane to manage at longer distances, but an ongoing live feed of Saturn would be mind-blowing (for about a week).

CenterPuke88 said...

Bandwidth. There’s simply no way to “stream” a live view at any real distance. The broadcast power of the probes we send is pretty small, Cassini-Huggens was pushing all of 81w at its estimated peak. The only “real-time” transmission (actually about 80 minutes delayed) was the RSS system, which only transmitted a carrier signal. This system allowed determination of various gases and objects that the radio waves interfered with. For total downlinked data per day, Cassini can return about 5 GB total per day. So it could possibly return a 240p video signal a maximum of 16 hours day...except that 4 of those 5 GB occurred when the craft reoriented to aim its high gain antenna at earth for 9 hours a day, rendering it unable to make observations.